On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 2 of 2)

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Guest post by Rupprecht Podszun, professor of Civil Law, German and European Competition Law at the University of Düsseldorf *

The German legislator currently amends the competition code so as to update it for the digital economy. This is a pioneering step. After having examined part of the proposed amendments yesterday (see here), this post will describe the new rules for the digital economy.

New rules for the digital economy

The implementation of the directive and the closing of the sausage gap coincided with a heated debate in German media on the power of internet companies, these Voldemorts from the Silicon Valley. Vice-Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel and the head of the influential German media house Axel Springer, Mathias Döpfner, led the campaign against Google & Co. And so, Gabriel’s ministry came up with new rules for the digital economy. Continue reading “On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 2 of 2)”

On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 1 of 2)

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©Bundeskartellamt


Guest post by Rupprecht Podszun,
professor of Civil Law, German and European Competition Law at the University of Düsseldorf *

The German legislator currently amends the antitrust act so as to update it for the digital economy. This is a pioneering step. This post will deal with some of the proposed amendments, while the next post (see here) will describe the new rules for the digital economy.

All EU Member States are working on a change of their competition law statutes, and actually should have completed that work by December 27, 2016. They need to implement the EU directive on antitrust damages claims (2014/104/EU) which aims at facilitating damage claims for victims of cartels and other anti-competitive practices that violate Art. 101 and 102 TFEU. At present, a mere handful of Member States has communicated success in amending their laws (see here). Continue reading “On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 1 of 2)”

When Supermodels Meet Competition Law

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Who said competition law is always about the same old markets?

Last November the Italian Competition Authority dealt with something other than pharmaceutical or telecommunication, as it found that 8 major model agencies set up a price-cartel. The investigation had been opened upon submission of a leniency application by the renowned agency IMG and led to a cumulative fine of 4.5 million euro. The other agencies found liable were Brave, D’management, Elite Model, Management, Enjoy, Major Model Management, Next Italy, Why Not and Women Models. Continue reading “When Supermodels Meet Competition Law”

Competition law in the pharmaceutical sector: Aspen fined for excessive pricing in Italy

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The Italian Competition Authority (“ICA”) has recently found that Aspen Pharmacare had increased the prices for some of its oncohematological drugs up to 1500% and imposed to the South African multinational a 5 million Euro fine for violation of art. 102, letter a) of the TFEU. Aspen has already communicated that it will appeal the decision.

Continue reading “Competition law in the pharmaceutical sector: Aspen fined for excessive pricing in Italy”

Google held liable in Italy for abuse of economic dependence

abuse of economic dependenceAfter being investigated for an alleged breach of competition law, Google is now experiencing negative outcomes also in the context of private enforcement, as the Court of first instance of Milan held Big G liable for abuse of economic dependence. This concept is unknown to EU competition law and is a separate concept from the abuse of dominant position.

Continue reading “Google held liable in Italy for abuse of economic dependence”

Into the void – The lack of interaction of IP and competition law internationally

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Competition law is well recognized and enforced either regionally or nationally in a large part of the modern world. However, quite surprisingly, there is no comprehensive international agreement, which would regulate competition law in any great substantive detail. An international agreement has certainly been discussed, but even today there is no global agreement, which could be compared e.g. to the Paris or Berne Conventions or TRIPS. The role of competition law has also been discussed within the framework of the WTO dispute resolution mechanism, but it has not won any significant ground within the system. Continue reading “Into the void – The lack of interaction of IP and competition law internationally”

The difficult marriage of IP & competition law

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The relationship between IP and competition law has certainly not been a bed of roses. Initially, the two regimes were regarded as separate (inherency theory). One could argue that the primary goal of IP is to promote innovation, while the primary goal of competition law is to promote competition. This is of course a somewhat simplified picture of the two regimes, since also other important objectives could be stressed, but this simplification helps to underscore that a certain tension between the regimes could be observed. Given the potential of conflict between objectives, it was argued that competition law only should play a role in situations where the IP holder goes beyond the exclusive right. Continue reading “The difficult marriage of IP & competition law”

Antitrust compliance programs and limitation of liability in Italy

Antitrust compliance programsSince fines issued by competition authorities are a major concern for companies, the implementation of antitrust compliance programs should be a priority for legal counsel. Indeed, antitrust fines are of a purely punitive nature and are usually followed by damage lawsuits filed by the harmed parties. Therefore, these fines amount to an abrupt loss and do not exempt the liable firm to compensate harmed parties for the damages suffered. As a consequence, all the companies involved in antitrust investigations should consider implementing a defensive strategy aimed at minimizing the amount of the fine. Continue reading “Antitrust compliance programs and limitation of liability in Italy”