“Colour” your rights or not?

Guest post by Florica Rus*

Over the years, many companies have sought trade mark protection for colours or colour combinations. This strategy turned out to be not a plain sailing.

Since Libertel – C-104/01 and Heidelberger Bauchemie – C-49/02 judgments, colours are recognised as a factor that may lead consumers to a purchasing decision. However, colours are considered to have a limited capacity to communicate an indication of origin to the consumers and being distinctive is not their strength.

On 22 July 2017, the General Court held that three identical rectangular coloured stripes do not make the mark distinctive enough to fulfil the commercial origin function (T-612/15). The figurative mark applied for – EUTM 012880481 (three stripes colour) for goods in classes 18, 25 and 26, was found to be neither distinctive nor to have acquired distinctiveness through use. The Court illustrated that consumers in the fashion sector are not used to identify the origin of the product based on a colour and three coloured stripes will not be apprehended as an indicator of origin. Continue reading ““Colour” your rights or not?”

Peruvian patent litigation on infringement and invalidation: A sui generis case of bifurcation

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Guest post by Diego F. Ortega*

The Andean Community is the result of the seeking of the balanced and harmonious development of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, which in May 26, 1969 signed the Cartagena Agreement, laying the groundwork for the creation of a subregional community initially known as Andean Pact and later renamed as Andean Community. In order to achieve the said objective, the Andean Community promotes a continuous process of integration and economic and social cooperation. In particular, this process of integration involves the need of having common rules as to matters that foster the unification of the market, such as industrial property rights.

The industrial property system within the Andean Community was established by the “Decision 486”, which aims to guarantee a rigorous scrutiny as to the fulfillment of the requirements needed for the granting of a patent. Thus, Andean Community does not provide only for the mandatory performance of a substantive examination carried out by the national patent authorities of its Member Countries, but also for mechanisms which allow third parties to prove that an invention does not meet the legal requirements, seeking the denial of the patent (through a pre-grant opposition request) or, if the patent is granted, its revocation (through an invalidation request). Continue reading “Peruvian patent litigation on infringement and invalidation: A sui generis case of bifurcation”

On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 2 of 2)

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Guest post by Rupprecht Podszun, professor of Civil Law, German and European Competition Law at the University of Düsseldorf *

The German legislator currently amends the competition code so as to update it for the digital economy. This is a pioneering step. After having examined part of the proposed amendments yesterday (see here), this post will describe the new rules for the digital economy.

New rules for the digital economy

The implementation of the directive and the closing of the sausage gap coincided with a heated debate in German media on the power of internet companies, these Voldemorts from the Silicon Valley. Vice-Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel and the head of the influential German media house Axel Springer, Mathias Döpfner, led the campaign against Google & Co. And so, Gabriel’s ministry came up with new rules for the digital economy. Continue reading “On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 2 of 2)”

On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 1 of 2)

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©Bundeskartellamt


Guest post by Rupprecht Podszun,
professor of Civil Law, German and European Competition Law at the University of Düsseldorf *

The German legislator currently amends the antitrust act so as to update it for the digital economy. This is a pioneering step. This post will deal with some of the proposed amendments, while the next post (see here) will describe the new rules for the digital economy.

All EU Member States are working on a change of their competition law statutes, and actually should have completed that work by December 27, 2016. They need to implement the EU directive on antitrust damages claims (2014/104/EU) which aims at facilitating damage claims for victims of cartels and other anti-competitive practices that violate Art. 101 and 102 TFEU. At present, a mere handful of Member States has communicated success in amending their laws (see here). Continue reading “On sausages and Facebook/WhatsApp – Germany reforms its antitrust act (part 1 of 2)”

Sad to CJEU Go? What Brexit Could Mean for Intellectual Property (part 2 of 2)

Guest post by William Wortley*

In this article we conclude our look at the potential implications of Brexit on the European intellectual property law framework. (Part 1 can be seen here).

Copyright

Although copyright is less harmonised than other areas of IP, it does not escape the potential ramifications of a “hard” Brexit. The Commission has signalled its intention to push forward with the Digital Single Market (DSM) Strategy, reshaping copyright to make it fit for the digital age. Certain legislation, such as the proposed Content Portability Regulation, are expected to come into force prior to the UK’s exit from the EU, although this will not stop it potentially losing effect post-Brexit if a settlement is not achieved. The regulation allows EU consumers to access digital content provided in their Member State of residence if temporarily in another Member State. If the content localisation provisions no longer applies after Brexit, content providers in the UK will be severely hampered by having to negotiate licences in the remaining Member States. The issue is of commercial importance to UK businesses, Continue reading “Sad to CJEU Go? What Brexit Could Mean for Intellectual Property (part 2 of 2)”

Sad to CJEU Go? What Brexit Could Mean for Intellectual Property (part 1 of 2)

Guest post by William Wortley*

It is over six months since the United Kingdom (UK) decided to leave the European Union (EU). The uncertainty surrounding the timing and form of the exit remains undimmed and much remains unknown about how IP rights will be affected. This week’s statement on Brexit by Theresa May make it an excellent time to revisit what the referendum result could mean for IP rights.

Patent Rights

Immediately after the Brexit vote, questions were raised about the implications for the Unified Patent Court (UPC). To the surprise of some commentators, the UK announced its intention to ratify the UPC agreement on 28 November 2016, stating that the UK would continue to work with the preparatory committee to bring the UPC into force as soon as possible. Continue reading “Sad to CJEU Go? What Brexit Could Mean for Intellectual Property (part 1 of 2)”

The Crispr Cas9 battle reaches oral arguments before the United States Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) and the stakes are favoring the Broad Institute

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Guest post by Lucia Tamayo Del Portillo*

In early 2012, a group of scientists from the University of California Berkeley (“UC”) led by Dr. Jennifer Doudna, in collaboration with the University of Vienna and fellow researcher Emmanuel Charpentier, filed the first patent application for a revolutionary gene-editing tool called Crispr Cas9. The Crispr and its associated protein Cas9 is a natural existing response to immunological hazard that can be found in bacteria. By a combination of complex biochemical interactions, bacteria is able to identify foreign DNA, cleave to it, and then induce a break on the DNA strand, causing its instant deactivation. UC’s first patent application was broad and mainly tested in rather simple living organisms such as bacteria. Few months after this application, the Broad Institute (“Broad”) along with the MIT and the Harvard College, filed another patent application over the Crispr Cas9. Dr. Feng Zhang commanded the main research team behind this invention. This subsequent application was limited to the use of the Crispr Cas9 method in eukaryotic organisms for example, plants and animals. Continue reading “The Crispr Cas9 battle reaches oral arguments before the United States Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) and the stakes are favoring the Broad Institute”

IP, Investment Arbitration and Policy Justifications

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Guest post by Ivan Stepanov*

International investment agreements (IIAs) are international treaties which protect investors coming from one state and their investment in another. They represent the source of what is called international investment law. IIAs have endemic protection standards with the protection against expropriation and the “fair and equitable treatment” (FET) standard being most prominent.

Even though IIAs are instruments of public international law, the dispute settlement mechanism embedded in the treaties offers the investor, a private party, to challenge the state, if it holds that through state action, it or its investment have suffered economic losses. The actions of the state are then assessed in light of the aforementioned protection standards. This mechanism is called the investor-state dispute settlement or more commonly addressed as investment arbitration. Essentially through investment arbitration an investor has the chance to sue the state in an international forum inside a specific legal environment. Continue reading “IP, Investment Arbitration and Policy Justifications”