Why did Japanese electronics companies surpass rivals in technologies and number of patents, but lose in business?

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Car navigation systems, DVD players, liquid crystal displays, solar panels, DRAM memory and lithium ion batteries are products that have been invented and developed mainly by Japanese companies. The companies created new markets and got high market shares with many patents to exclude rival companies. Then the world’s markets expanded several times larger in scale. They kept investing high amounts in R&D for higher functionalities. Their world’s market shares recorded once more than 80% in all above-mentioned products except for DRAM memory (more than 40%). However, even though the market expanded, their shares have been drastically decreasing although they had developed cutting edge technologies with many patents related thereto. There is one report (Masahiro Samejima et al., Encouragement of IP Strategy, February, 2016), which analyzed the reason of their defeat in business and introduced a new interesting point of view. I would like to briefly discuss it here.

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AG Wahl provides guidance to define “excessive prices” under EU competition law

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Some months ago, in a public speech, the EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager set the antitrust radar against exploitative conducts and, particularly, against “excessive pricing” in the pharmaceutical, energy and hi-tech markets. Her words had a lot of echo in the antitrust community, since the Commission is traditionally reluctant to step against high prices, for many different reasons (essentially, it lacks of resources and expertise to define “fair” prices, if this concept really exists).

In the past days, Advocate General Wahl came back to that topic and, in response to a request for a preliminary ruling, delivered to the CJEU an opinion on the issue of “excessive pricing”. AG Wahl’s reasoning mainly relates to the market concerned by the request for a preliminary ruling, namely the licensing business of collecting societies. However, it shreds some light on one of the most economic issues of competition law, and, if the opinion is confirmed by the Court, it will provide guidance for future investigations. Continue reading “AG Wahl provides guidance to define “excessive prices” under EU competition law”

Reverse burden of proof and trade secrets in patent litigation – Part one

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Background – lack of protection

For a long time in many European countries, pharmaceutical compounds were not eligible for patent protection. Prior to the adoption of TRIPS, there were actually 22 countries in which the protection of pharmaceutical compounds was unavailable. Innovative pharmaceutical developers were only able to indirectly try to protect their pharmaceutical product by protecting the process for manufacturing the product. At the time, some states made efforts to compensate for the lack of product protection in different ways. In Finland, you could apply for a so called “analogous process patent”, by which you were able to get a patent for if you had developed a new product, but the scope of protection was, odd as it may seem, nevertheless restricted to the manufacturing process.

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